Role of Visual Feedback Treatment for Defective /s/ Sounds in Patients With Cleft Palate The role of visual feedback in the treatment of defective /s/ sounds in patients with cleft palate is described. Six patients with cleft palate who were similar in age, velopharyngeal function, and type of misarticulation were selected for this study. Treatment was provided using either visual feedback or no visual ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1993
Role of Visual Feedback Treatment for Defective /s/ Sounds in Patients With Cleft Palate
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ken-ichi Michi
    First Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery School of Dentistry Showa University Tokyo, Japan
  • Yukari Yamashita
    First Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery School of Dentistry Showa University Tokyo, Japan
  • Satoko Imai
    First Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery School of Dentistry Showa University Tokyo, Japan
  • Noriko Suzuki
    First Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery School of Dentistry Showa University Tokyo, Japan
  • Hiroshi Yoshida
    First Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery School of Dentistry Showa University Tokyo, Japan
  • Currently affiliated with the Department of Stomatology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
    Currently affiliated with the Department of Stomatology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.×
  • Contact author: Ken-ichi Michi, DDS, PhD, First Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 2-1-1, Kitasenzoku, Ohta-ku, Tokyo, 145, Japan.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1993
Role of Visual Feedback Treatment for Defective /s/ Sounds in Patients With Cleft Palate
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 277-285. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.277
History: Received October 18, 1991 , Accepted September 30, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 277-285. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.277
History: Received October 18, 1991; Accepted September 30, 1992

The role of visual feedback in the treatment of defective /s/ sounds in patients with cleft palate is described. Six patients with cleft palate who were similar in age, velopharyngeal function, and type of misarticulation were selected for this study. Treatment was provided using either visual feedback or no visual feedback. Visual feedback for tongue placement was provided by the Rion Electropalatograph (EPG). Visual feedback for frication was provided by a multi-function speech training aid (MFSTA). Improvement in /s/ sound production was assessed objectively using a method described previously (Michi et al., 1986). The results indicated that visual feedback for tongue placement and frication was especially useful in the treatment of defective /s/ sounds in patients with cleft palate who exhibited abnormal posterior tongue posturing during the production of dental or alveolar sounds.

Acknowledgments
This paper is based on oral presentations at the 5th International Congress on Cleft Palate and Related Craniofacial Anomalies, Monte Carlo, September 2–7,1985; the 9th International Conference on Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Vancouver, May 21–25, 1986; and the 20th Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics, Tokyo, August 3–7,1987.
This research was originally supported by the National Research and Development Program for Medical and Welfare Apparatus of The Ministry of International Trade and Industry.
The authors thank M. E. Groher, Chief, Audiology and Speech Pathology, James A. Haley Veterans Hospital, Tampa, Florida, for his thoughtful review of the manuscript, and A. Simpson, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan, for editorial assistance.
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