Speech Production Changes Under Fluency-Evoking Conditions in Nonstuttering Speakers Changes in airflow and intraoral pressure between baseline and four fluency-evoking Conditions—choral reading (CR), metronome pacing (MET), delayed auditory feedback (DAF), and masking noise (NOISE)—were studied in 12 American English nonstuttering speakers. The duration, amplitude, and velocity of airflow and intraoral pressure development during the initial plosive and the duration ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1993
Speech Production Changes Under Fluency-Evoking Conditions in Nonstuttering Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sheila V. Stager
    National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders National Institutes of Health Bethesda, MD
  • Christy L. Ludlow
    National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders National Institutes of Health Bethesda, MD
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1993
Speech Production Changes Under Fluency-Evoking Conditions in Nonstuttering Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 245-253. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.245
History: Received March 19, 1992 , Accepted September 11, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 245-253. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.245
History: Received March 19, 1992; Accepted September 11, 1992

Changes in airflow and intraoral pressure between baseline and four fluency-evoking Conditions—choral reading (CR), metronome pacing (MET), delayed auditory feedback (DAF), and masking noise (NOISE)—were studied in 12 American English nonstuttering speakers. The duration, amplitude, and velocity of airflow and intraoral pressure development during the initial plosive and the duration and intensity of the following vowel were measured in eight target CVC words. Speech rate was computed for each sentence. Comparisons between baseline and the corresponding production in each condition revealed significant changes in peak flow, pressure rise time, peak instantaneous pressure velocity, speech rate, intensity, and vowel duration. Vowel duration increased under DAF, MET, and NOISE conditions. Peak pressure and pressure velocity decreased during CR and MET and increased during NOISE, but did not change during DAF. Subjects were consistent in the variables they modified across conditions. Changes in the aerodynamic variables were not related to intensity or rate changes. Thus, nonstuttering speakers modify intraoral pressure and flow under fluency-evoking conditions.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to acknowledge the assistance of the following: Sue Sedory, for recording the choral reading sentences; Geralyn M. Schulz, Sue Sedory, Eileen Bedall, and Celia Bassich for assisting during patient testing; and Mihoko Fujita and Sheng-guang Yin for inserting the Millar catheter.
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