Verbal Analogical Reasoning in Children With Language-Learning Disabilities This study was designed to explore the influences of both cognitive and linguistic abilities on verbal analogy completion. School-age children classified as language-learning disabled were administered five types of verbal analogies: synonyms, antonyms, linear order, category membership, and functional relationship. The performance of the children with language-learning disabilities was compared ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1993
Verbal Analogical Reasoning in Children With Language-Learning Disabilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie J. Masterson
    Southwest Missouri State University Springfield, MO
  • Lea Helen Evans
    The University of Mississippi University, MS
  • Mark Aloia
    The University of Mississippi University, MS
  • Contact author: Julie J. Masterson, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, Southwest Missouri State University, 901 S.National, Springfield, MO 65804.
Article Information
Development / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1993
Verbal Analogical Reasoning in Children With Language-Learning Disabilities
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 76-82. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.76
History: Received January 23, 1992 , Accepted August 4, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 76-82. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.76
History: Received January 23, 1992; Accepted August 4, 1992

This study was designed to explore the influences of both cognitive and linguistic abilities on verbal analogy completion. School-age children classified as language-learning disabled were administered five types of verbal analogies: synonyms, antonyms, linear order, category membership, and functional relationship. The performance of the children with language-learning disabilities was compared with one group of normally developing children matched for mental age and another group matched for language age. Results indicated that the group matched for mental age performed better than the other two groups on all types of analogies. Although they had significantly higher mental ages, the children with language-learning disabilities did no better than the language-matched group on any analogy type except antonyms.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this study were completed while the first author was on the faculty at the University of Mississippi, and funding was provided by the Graduate School and the College of Liberal Arts. We appreciate the efforts of Rene Friemoth-Lee, Ann Carpenter, Sarah Blackwell, Cindy Bounds, Sherry Inmon, Bonnie Buntin, Maggie Farmer, Bob McCord, Carol Dye, Wanda Dean, and Tom King in locating subjects for participation in this study. Thanks also goes to Elizabeth Neuse and Robert Sternberg for supplying items for the analogy task. We appreciate the comments of Holly Craig, Marilyn Nippold, Bruce Tomblin, and an anonymous reviewer on an earlier version of this manuscript.
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