Respiratory and Laryngeal Function of Women and Men During Vocal Intensity Variation Simultaneous procedures for making aerodynamic and kinematic observations of the laryngeal and chest wall systems were used to investigate variations in vocal intensity in normal women and men. Laryngeal results indicate that significant increases of maximum flow declination rate and laryngeal airway resistance and significant decreases in open quotient occur ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1993
Respiratory and Laryngeal Function of Women and Men During Vocal Intensity Variation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elaine T. Stathopoulos
    State University of New York at Buffalo
  • Christine Sapienza
    State University of New York at Buffalo
  • Contact author: Elaine T. Stathopoulos, PhD, CDS, Park Hall, Room 109, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1993
Respiratory and Laryngeal Function of Women and Men During Vocal Intensity Variation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 64-75. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.64
History: Received February 21, 1992 , Accepted July 21, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 64-75. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.64
History: Received February 21, 1992; Accepted July 21, 1992

Simultaneous procedures for making aerodynamic and kinematic observations of the laryngeal and chest wall systems were used to investigate variations in vocal intensity in normal women and men. Laryngeal results indicate that significant increases of maximum flow declination rate and laryngeal airway resistance and significant decreases in open quotient occur when higher intensity levels are produced. Respiratory results indicate that tracheal pressure, percent rib cage contribution, lung volume, and rib cage volume initiations are higher, and lung and rib cage volume excursions are larger when higher vocal intensity levels are produced. Laryngeal and respiratory function results indicate that some measures are different for women than for men. Mean data support the notion that increases in tracheal pressure are achieved by inhaling to higher lung and rib cage volumes. Individual subject data provide alternative respiratory and laryngeal patterns for changing the shape of the glottal airflow waveform.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access