Speaking Rate and Speech Movement Velocity Profiles The effects of speaking rate on the velocity profiles of movements of the lower lip and tongue tip during the production of stop consonants were examined using an x-ray microbeam system. Five young adults used a magnitude production task to produce five speaking rates that ranged from very fast to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1993
Speaking Rate and Speech Movement Velocity Profiles
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Scott G. Adams
    The Toronto Hospital Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Gary Weismer
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Raymond D. Kent
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1993
Speaking Rate and Speech Movement Velocity Profiles
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 41-54. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.41
History: Received November 21, 1991 , Accepted July 14, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 41-54. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.41
History: Received November 21, 1991; Accepted July 14, 1992

The effects of speaking rate on the velocity profiles of movements of the lower lip and tongue tip during the production of stop consonants were examined using an x-ray microbeam system. Five young adults used a magnitude production task to produce five speaking rates that ranged from very fast to very slow. Results indicated that changes in speaking rate were associated with changes in the topology of the speech movement velocity-time function. Specifically, the velocity profile changed from a symmetrical, single-peaked function at the fast speaking rates to an asymmetrical and multi-peaked function at the slow speaking rates. This variation in velocity profile shape is interpreted as support for the view that alterations in speaking rate are associated with changes in motor control strategies. In particular, the control strategy for speech gestures produced at fast speaking rates appears to involve unitary movements that may be predominately preprogrammed, whereas gestures produced at slow speaking rates consist of multiple submovements that may be influenced by feedback mechanisms.

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