Middle Ear Resonance and Acoustic Immittance Measures in Children This study established a normal middle ear resonance estimated from sweep frequency tympanometry (250–2000 Hz) and established normal equivalent ear canal volume, static acoustic admittance, and tympanometric peak pressure at 226 Hz in children with normal hearing (N=90) and in children with severe to profound sensorineural impairments (N=68). Children’s ages ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1993
Middle Ear Resonance and Acoustic Immittance Measures in Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Wendy D. Hanks
    Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Brigham Young University Provo, UT
  • Katie J. Rose
    Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Brigham Young University Provo, UT
  • Contact author: Wendy D. Hanks, PhD, Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, 138 TLRB, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1993
Middle Ear Resonance and Acoustic Immittance Measures in Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 218-222. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.218
History: Received December 19, 1991 , Accepted August 25, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 218-222. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.218
History: Received December 19, 1991; Accepted August 25, 1992

This study established a normal middle ear resonance estimated from sweep frequency tympanometry (250–2000 Hz) and established normal equivalent ear canal volume, static acoustic admittance, and tympanometric peak pressure at 226 Hz in children with normal hearing (N=90) and in children with severe to profound sensorineural impairments (N=68). Children’s ages ranged from 6 to 15 years. No statistically significant differences between the groups or across ages were found. Means, standard deviations, and 90% ranges (5–95%) for these four tympanometric measures are presented and compared to other studies.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported, in part, by a grant from the College of Education at Brigham Young University. The authors express appreciation to the Utah School for the Deaf and to the Provo and Alpineschool districts for assistance in obtaining subjects. We also expressappreciation to Janet Shanks, Richard Wilson, Richard Harris, andDavid McPherson for their support and suggestions.
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