The Effect of Otitis Media With Effusion on the Masking-Level Difference and the Auditory Brainstem Response This study investigated the masking-level difference (MLD) and auditory brainstem response (ABR) in a group of children with a history of otitis media with effusion (OME) and a control group of children with no known history of ear disease. All children had normal hearing at the time of testing. The ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1993
The Effect of Otitis Media With Effusion on the Masking-Level Difference and the Auditory Brainstem Response
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph W. Hall
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • John H. Grose
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Contact author: Joseph W. Hall, PhD, School of Medicine, Division of Otolaryngology, CB #7070, Burnett-Womack Clinical Sciences Building, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599–7070.
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1993
The Effect of Otitis Media With Effusion on the Masking-Level Difference and the Auditory Brainstem Response
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 210-217. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.210
History: Received April 20, 1992 , Accepted August 13, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 210-217. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.210
History: Received April 20, 1992; Accepted August 13, 1992

This study investigated the masking-level difference (MLD) and auditory brainstem response (ABR) in a group of children with a history of otitis media with effusion (OME) and a control group of children with no known history of ear disease. All children had normal hearing at the time of testing. The main goal of the study was to determine whether there was an association between a reduced MLD in the OME children and an abnormal ABR (in terms of prolonged absolute or interwave intervals, or interaural differences in the ABR waveforms). The results indicated that the group of children having a history of OME had significantly reduced MLDs and had significantly prolonged waves III and V, and I–III and I–V interwave intervals. The correlations between MLD and delays in absolute wave or interwave intervals were not significant. However, some correlations between interaural asymmetries of the interwave intervals and the MLD were significant. The results suggest that the reduction in MLD found in children having a history of OME may be related to abnormal brainstem processing.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by a grant from NIH NIDCD. We thank Debora Hatch and Madhu B. Dev for assistance in running subjects and for helpful discussions, and we thank Robert Margolis and Cynthia Fowler for constructive criticisms of an earlier version of the manuscript.
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