Real Ear to 6-cm3 Coupler Differences in Young Children Real-ear sound pressure levels under supra-aural earphones were measured for a group of young children (9 months to 7 years) and adults. Pure-tone signals were presented at nine test frequencies from 250 to 6000 Hz, and real ear to 6-cm3 coupler differences were computed for each frequency. Results suggest that, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1993
Real Ear to 6-cm3 Coupler Differences in Young Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dawna E. Lewis
    Boys Town National Research Hospital Omaha, NE
  • Patricia G. Stelmachowicz
    Boys Town National Research Hospital Omaha, NE
  • Contact author: Dawna E. Lewis, MA, Boys Town National Research Hospital, 555 North 30th Street, Omaha, NE 68131.
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1993
Real Ear to 6-cm3 Coupler Differences in Young Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 204-209. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.204
History: Received June 19, 1992 , Accepted August 10, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 204-209. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.204
History: Received June 19, 1992; Accepted August 10, 1992

Real-ear sound pressure levels under supra-aural earphones were measured for a group of young children (9 months to 7 years) and adults. Pure-tone signals were presented at nine test frequencies from 250 to 6000 Hz, and real ear to 6-cm3 coupler differences were computed for each frequency. Results suggest that, by 2 years of age, average real ear to 6-cm3 coupler differences are similar for adults and children. The intersubject variability for all groups supports the need for real-ear threshold measures on an individual basis in cases where the ability to amplify the speech spectrum to a level that is audible across the frequency range is in question.

Acknowledgments
The authors thank Kathy Beauchaine, Brenda Bergman, and Donna Neff for their helpful comments on an earlier version of this paper, and Betsy From for her assistance with manuscript preparation. The authors also thank Laura Shulte for her assistance with statistical analysis. Portions of this paper were presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association convention, Atlanta, Georgia, November 1991. This work was supported in part by NIH.
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