Speech Intelligibility of Children With Cochlear Implants, Tactile Aids, or Hearing Aids Speech intelligibility was measured in 31 children who used the 3M/House single-channel implant (n=12), the Nucleus 22-Channel Cochlear Implant System (n=15), or the Tactaid II + two-channel vibrotactile aid (n=4). The subjects were divided into subgroups based on age at onset of deafness (early or late). The speech intelligibility of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1993
Speech Intelligibility of Children With Cochlear Implants, Tactile Aids, or Hearing Aids
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Joe Osberger
    Indiana University School of Medicine Indianapolis
  • Monica Maso
    Indiana University School of Medicine Indianapolis
  • Leslie K. Sam
    Indiana University School of Medicine Indianapolis
  • Contact author: Mary Joe Osberger, PhD, Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, DeVault Otologic Research Laboratory, Riley Research Wing, Room 044, Indianapolis, IN 46202.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1993
Speech Intelligibility of Children With Cochlear Implants, Tactile Aids, or Hearing Aids
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 186-203. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.186
History: Received October 17, 1991 , Accepted August 7, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 186-203. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.186
History: Received October 17, 1991; Accepted August 7, 1992

Speech intelligibility was measured in 31 children who used the 3M/House single-channel implant (n=12), the Nucleus 22-Channel Cochlear Implant System (n=15), or the Tactaid II + two-channel vibrotactile aid (n=4). The subjects were divided into subgroups based on age at onset of deafness (early or late). The speech intelligibility of the experimental subjects was compared to that of children who were profoundly hearing impaired who used conventional hearing aids (n=12) or no sensory aid (n=2). The subjects with early onset of deafness who received their single- or multichannel cochlear implant before age 10 demonstrated the highest speech intelligibility, whereas subjects who did not receive their device until after age 10 had the poorest speech intelligibility. There was no obvious difference in the speech intelligibility scores of these subjects as a function of type of device (implant or tactile aid). On the average, the postimplant or tactile aid speech intelligibility of the subjects with early onset of deafness was similar to that of hearing aid users with hearing levels between 100 and 110 dB HL and limited hearing in the high frequencies. The speech intelligibility of subjects with late onset of deafness showed marked deterioration after the onset of deafness with relatively large improvements by most subjects after they received a single- or multichannel implant. The one subject with late onset of deafness who used a tactile aid showed no improvement in speech intelligibility.

Acknowledgments
The authors gratefully acknowledge Amy McConkey Robbins, Susan L. Todd, Stacey W. Berry, and Linda J. Hesketh for their assistance in data collection. We also wish to thank Barbara Stroer, the staff at St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf, and Susan Zimmerman-Phillips and John L. Kemink for allowing us to test children from their institutions. This work was supported by NIH-NIDCD grant DC00423.
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