Relative Satisfaction for Frequency Responses Selected With a Simplex Procedure in Different Listening Conditions The purpose of this study was to compare everyday satisfaction with hearing aid frequency responses selected using a Simplex procedure and those selected using the National Acoustic Laboratories’ formula (NAL-R). Nineteen elderly subjects with impaired hearing selected their preferred frequency responses under six listening conditions. The conditions included syllable identification ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1993
Relative Satisfaction for Frequency Responses Selected With a Simplex Procedure in Different Listening Conditions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Francis K. Kuk
    University of Iowa Iowa City and University of Illinois at Chicago
  • Nonalee M. C. Pape
    University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Contact author: Francis K. Kuk, PhD, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary, 1855 West Taylor Street, Chicago, IL 60612.
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1993
Relative Satisfaction for Frequency Responses Selected With a Simplex Procedure in Different Listening Conditions
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 168-177. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.168
History: Received October 8, 1991 , Accepted June 19, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 168-177. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.168
History: Received October 8, 1991; Accepted June 19, 1992

The purpose of this study was to compare everyday satisfaction with hearing aid frequency responses selected using a Simplex procedure and those selected using the National Acoustic Laboratories’ formula (NAL-R). Nineteen elderly subjects with impaired hearing selected their preferred frequency responses under six listening conditions. The conditions included syllable identification and discourse quality judgment in quiet, in moderate noise (65 dB SPL), and in loud noise (80 dB SPL) backgrounds. Subjects subsequently wore a multimemory hearing aid programmed with these frequency responses and compared their satisfaction with the various frequency responses in daily listening environments. Subjects showed differential preference across the available frequency responses. Subjects with sloping hearing losses did not show a difference in preference among the selected frequency responses, including that prescribed by NAL-R. On the other hand, subjects with a flat hearing loss showed a slight, but consistent, preference for frequency responses selected while listening to discourse passages in a moderate noise background. These observations suggest that the Simplex procedure may be useful for selecting preferred frequency responses for some hearing aid wearers.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education-Innovation Research Grants, (Contract Number H133C90020). Portions of this study were presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention in Atlanta, November, 1991. We thank David Fabry, Jerry Punch, and an anonymous reviewer for their comments.
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