Following the Child’s Lead When Teaching Nouns to Preschoolers With Mental Retardation The current study tested the effects of following the child’s attentional lead on the efficiency of object-label teaching. Three preschoolers with mental retardation participated. An alternating-treatments design was used to test relative treatment effects. An elicited-production method of teaching object labels was used to present the words under two conditions. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1993
Following the Child’s Lead When Teaching Nouns to Preschoolers With Mental Retardation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul J. Yoder
    Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
  • Ann P. Kaiser
    Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
  • Cathy Alpert
    Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
  • Rebecca Fischer
    Bill Wilkerson Speech & Hearing Center Nashville, TN
  • Contact author: Paul J. Yoder, PhD, Kennedy Center, Special Education, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37203.
Article Information
Development / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1993
Following the Child’s Lead When Teaching Nouns to Preschoolers With Mental Retardation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 158-167. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.158
History: Received February 5, 1992 , Accepted August 31, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 158-167. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.158
History: Received February 5, 1992; Accepted August 31, 1992

The current study tested the effects of following the child’s attentional lead on the efficiency of object-label teaching. Three preschoolers with mental retardation participated. An alternating-treatments design was used to test relative treatment effects. An elicited-production method of teaching object labels was used to present the words under two conditions. Two sets of 32 nonsense words and unfamiliar objects were randomly assigned to the two teaching conditions to create equivalent goal sets and to control for prior exposure to the words and objects. Under the "following-the-child’s-lead" condition, teaching episodes occurred only when the child had sustained attention to a target object or intentionally communicated about the target object. Under the "recruiting-the-child’s-attention" condition, the child’s attention was recruited intrusively away from his or her object of interest and toward the target object before each teaching episode began. The number of teaching trials per item and per session was carefully controlled. Results indicated that object-label teaching was more efficient under the following-the-child’slead condition for all three participants.

Acknowledgments
The authors appreciate the contributions of Maureen Keefer, Martha P’ Poole, and Janet Howell to this paper. They thank Steve Warren for his comments on an earlier version. This study was supported by Department of Education Grant No. G008730528.
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