Two Approaches to the Facilitation of Grammar in Children With Language Impairment An Experimental Evaluation Research Article
EDITOR'S AWARD
Research Article  |   February 01, 1993
Two Approaches to the Facilitation of Grammar in Children With Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marc E. Fey
    University of Kansas Medical Center Kansas City
  • Patricia L. Cleave
    University of Kansas Lawrence
  • Steven H. Long
    Ithaca College Ithaca, NY
  • Diana L. Hughes
    Central Michigan University Mount Pleasant, MI
  • Contact author: Marc E. Fey, PhD, Department of Hearing and Speech, The University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160-7605.
Article Information
Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1993
Two Approaches to the Facilitation of Grammar in Children With Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 141-157. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.141
History: Received April 6, 1992 , Accepted August 31, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 141-157. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.141
History: Received April 6, 1992; Accepted August 31, 1992

Two approaches to grammar facilitation in preschool-age children with language impairment were evaluated. One approach was administered by a speech-language pathologist and the other was presented by the subjects’ parents, who were trained by the speech-language pathologist. Both treatment packages ran for 4 ½ months and made use of focused stimulation procedures and a cyclical goal-attack strategy. Subjects were 30 children between the ages of 3:8 and 5:10 (years:months) who had marked delays in grammatical development. Children who served in a delayed-treatment control group averaged no gains over their no-treatment period. In contrast, large treatment effects were observed for both treatment groups on three of four measures of grammatical expression. However, closer inspection of the data revealed that the effects for the clinician treatment were more consistent across treatment administrations than were those for the parent treatment. Although the specific contributions of the focused stimulation procedures and the cyclical goal attack strategy were not evaluated, the results support the viability of these components as parts of larger treatment packages. The results also support the participation of parents as primary intervention agents in grammar facilitation programs. When parents take such a large role in the intervention process, however, it is imperative that the children’s progress be monitored carefully and that program adjustments be made whenever gains are smaller than expected.

Acknowledgments
This study was presented in part at the 1991 Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in Atlanta, Georgia. The research was sponsored by the Ministry of Community and Social Services, Ontario. This funding was administered by the Research and Program Evaluation Unit in cooperation with the Ontario Mental Health Foundation and was funded from the MCSS Research Grants Program. We also gratefully acknowledge equipment contributions from the Ontario District Association of the Society for the Preservation of Barbershop Quartet Singing in America (the Barbershoppers). Able research assistance was provided by Kit Dench, Lynn Dupuis, Sarah Hawkins, David Loyst, Dan MacDougald, Chris Matthews, Cathy Moran, Sheila Murray, Anna Ravida, Brenda Ushiki, and Joanne Wickware.
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