Four New Speech and Prosody-Voice Measures for Genetics Research and Other Studies in Developmental Phonological Disorders Research in developmental phonological disorders, particularly emerging subgroup studies using behavioral and molecular genetics, requires qualitative and continuous measurement systems that meet a variety of substantive and psychometric assumptions. This paper reviews relevant issues underlying such needs and presents four measurement proposals developed expressly for causal-correlates research. The primary qualitative ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1993
Four New Speech and Prosody-Voice Measures for Genetics Research and Other Studies in Developmental Phonological Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lawrence D. Shriberg
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1993
Four New Speech and Prosody-Voice Measures for Genetics Research and Other Studies in Developmental Phonological Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 105-140. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.105
History: Received January 6, 1992 , Accepted August 21, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1993, Vol. 36, 105-140. doi:10.1044/jshr.3601.105
History: Received January 6, 1992; Accepted August 21, 1992

Research in developmental phonological disorders, particularly emerging subgroup studies using behavioral and molecular genetics, requires qualitative and continuous measurement systems that meet a variety of substantive and psychometric assumptions. This paper reviews relevant issues underlying such needs and presents four measurement proposals developed expressly for causal-correlates research. The primary qualitative system is the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS), a 10-category nosology for dichoto mous and hierarchical-polychoto mous classification of speech disorders from 2 years of age through adulthood. The three quantitative measures for segmental and suprasegmental analyses are (a) the Articulation Competence Index (ACI), an interval-level severity index that adjusts a subject’s Percentage of Consonants Correct (PCC) score for the relative percentage of distortion errors; (b) Speech Profiles, a series of graphic-numeric displays that profile a subject’s or group’s severity-adjusted consonant and vowel-diphthong mastery and error patterns; and (c) the Prosody-Voice profile, a graphic-numeric display that Profiles a subject’s or group’s status on six suprasegmental domains divided into 31 types of inappropriate prosody-voice codes. All data for the four measures are derived from one sample of conversational speech, which obviates the limitations of citation-form testing; enables speech assessment as a qualitative, semi-continuous, and continuous trait over the life span; and provides a context for univariate and multivariate statistical analyses of phonetic, phonologic, prosodic, and language variables in multiage, multidialectal, and multicultural populations. Rationale, procedures, validity data, and examples of uses for each measure are presented.

Acknowledgments
Joan Kwiatkowski provided substantial creative input to the development of each of the four measures; Doris Kistler provided steady statistical guidance; David Wilson provided imaginative programming support; and Diane Austin, Frederic Gruber, Gregory Lof, Carmen Rasmussen, and Dorothy Rorick provided competent and congenial research and editorial assistance. A list of over 40 persons who helped at some stage of the prosody-voice project is acknowledged in Shriberg, Kwiatkowski, and Rasmussen (1990) . Thanks also to Ken Bleile, Steve Camarata, Carol Stoel-Gammon, and an anonymous JSHR reviewer for their excellent editorial suggestions. This work was supported by the Public Health Service, NIDCD Grant No. DC00496.
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