Operant Response in Infants as a Function of Time Interval Following Signal Onset This study investigated the hypothesis that estimates of infant auditory threshold are lowered by extending the duration of individual test trials such that infants have more time to detect and respond to the acoustic signal. Forty 8- and 12-month-old infants were evaluated with an operant procedure to determine response latencies ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1992
Operant Response in Infants as a Function of Time Interval Following Signal Onset
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael A. Primus
    University of Wyoming Laramie
  • Contact author: Michael A. Primus, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, PO Box 3311, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071.
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1992
Operant Response in Infants as a Function of Time Interval Following Signal Onset
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1422-1425. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1422
History: Received November 15, 1991 , Accepted May 22, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1422-1425. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1422
History: Received November 15, 1991; Accepted May 22, 1992

This study investigated the hypothesis that estimates of infant auditory threshold are lowered by extending the duration of individual test trials such that infants have more time to detect and respond to the acoustic signal. Forty 8- and 12-month-old infants were evaluated with an operant procedure to determine response latencies at four near-threshold levels. Resulting data were used to estimate the effect of trial duration on threshold by calculating the response performance that occurred at several intervals following signal onset. Findings indicate that most detection responses occurred in the initial 4 sec of the test trial, and use of an 8-sec trial interval yielded little gain in performance. The data reflect an insignificant shift (<5.0 dB) in threshold as a function of extended trial intervals.

Acknowledgment
The author wishes to thank Lori Archie, Pamela Parker, and Susan Whaley for their assistance with this study.
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