Sustained Benefits of Hearing Aids This study was designed to evaluate long-term benefits of hearing aids in elderly individuals with hearing loss. A primary care cohort of 192 elderly, hearing-impaired veterans (mean age 72 ± 6, 97% White, 94% retired) were assessed at baseline and at 4, 8, and 12 months after hearing aid fitting. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1992
Sustained Benefits of Hearing Aids
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cynthia D. Mulrow
    University of Texas Health Science Center and Audie L. Murphy Memorial VA Hospital San Antonio
  • Michael R. Tuley
    University of Texas Health Science Center and Audie L. Murphy Memorial VA Hospital San Antonio
  • Christine Aguilar
    University of Texas Health Science Center and Audie L. Murphy Memorial VA Hospital San Antonio
  • Contact author: Cynthia D. Mulrow, MD, Audie L. Murphy Memorial Veterans Hospital (11C), 7400 Merton Minter Boulevard, San Antonio, TX 78284.
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1992
Sustained Benefits of Hearing Aids
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1402-1405. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1402
History: Received November 25, 1991 , Accepted April 30, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1402-1405. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1402
History: Received November 25, 1991; Accepted April 30, 1992

This study was designed to evaluate long-term benefits of hearing aids in elderly individuals with hearing loss. A primary care cohort of 192 elderly, hearing-impaired veterans (mean age 72 ± 6, 97% White, 94% retired) were assessed at baseline and at 4, 8, and 12 months after hearing aid fitting. Drop-out rates at 4, 8, and 12 months were 5%, 13%, and 16%, respectively. Outcome assessments included several quality-of-life scales: Hearing Handicap Inventory in the Elderly (HHIE), Quantified Denver Scale of Communication Function (QDS), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and the Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ). All quality-of-life areas improved significantly from baseline to 4-month post-hearing aid fittings (p< 0.05). Social and emotional (HHIE), communication (QDS), and depression (GDS) benefits were sustained at 8 and 12 months, whereas cognitive changes (SPMSQ) reverted to baseline at 12 months. We conclude that hearing aids provide sustained benefits for at least a year in these elderly individuals with hearing impairment.

Acknowledgments
Grant support for this study came from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, a Milbank Scholar Program Award, and an American College of Physicians' Teaching and Research Scholar Award. This paper was presented at The Society of General Internal Medicine Meeting, Seattle, May 1991.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access