Aging and the Binaural Advantage in Reverberation and Noise The consonant identification ability of younger normal-hearing adults and older adults with little or no peripheral hearing loss was assessed using monaural and binaural presentation in four listening conditions: quiet, noise, reverberation, and reverberation + noise. Performance was examined in terms of identification accuracy and amount of binaural advantage. Results ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1992
Aging and the Binaural Advantage in Reverberation and Noise
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen S. Helfer
    University of Massachusetts-Amherst
  • Contact author: Karen S. Heifer, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, University of Massachusetts—Amherst, 6 Arnold House, Amherst, MA 01003.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1992
Aging and the Binaural Advantage in Reverberation and Noise
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1394-1401. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1394
History: Received December 23, 1991 , Accepted April 28, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1394-1401. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1394
History: Received December 23, 1991; Accepted April 28, 1992

The consonant identification ability of younger normal-hearing adults and older adults with little or no peripheral hearing loss was assessed using monaural and binaural presentation in four listening conditions: quiet, noise, reverberation, and reverberation + noise. Performance was examined in terms of identification accuracy and amount of binaural advantage. Results suggest that the small amount of hearing loss in the older subjects limited their perception of distorted consonants. Neither age nor peripheral hearing loss was related strongly to the amount of benefit obtained from binaural presentation.

Acknowledgments
The authors thanks Rich Freyman, David Hawkins, and Larry Humes for their valuable comments on an earlier version of this manuscript. Portions of this paper were presented at the 1991 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention, Atlanta.
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