Effects of Configuration on the Paired-Associate Learning of Blissymbols by Preschool Children With Normal Cognitive Abilities Translucency appears to be a potent variable in the learning of Blissymbols by preschool children with normal cognitive abilities. Complexity does not appear to influence learning for these individuals when there is a concurrent condition of high translucency. However, a condition of high complexity seems to enhance the learnability of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1992
Effects of Configuration on the Paired-Associate Learning of Blissymbols by Preschool Children With Normal Cognitive Abilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donald R. Fuller
    University of Arkansas at Little Rock
  • Lyle L. Lloyd
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: Donald R. Fuller, PhD, Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204.
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1992
Effects of Configuration on the Paired-Associate Learning of Blissymbols by Preschool Children With Normal Cognitive Abilities
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1376-1383. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1376
History: Received November 5, 1991 , Accepted July 9, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1376-1383. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1376
History: Received November 5, 1991; Accepted July 9, 1992

Translucency appears to be a potent variable in the learning of Blissymbols by preschool children with normal cognitive abilities. Complexity does not appear to influence learning for these individuals when there is a concurrent condition of high translucency. However, a condition of high complexity seems to enhance the learnability of Blissymbols having low translucency. For the present experiment, an attempt was made to determine if symbol configuration affects the learning of highly complex Blissymbols that bear little relationship to their referents. A paired-associate learning paradigm was used to present 30 Blissymbols to 20 cognitively normal preschool children. These symbols were evenly divided into superimposed and nonsuperimposed groups. Results indicated that the children learned more superimposed symbols than their nonsuperimposed counterparts. The implications of this finding for the teaching of Blissymbols are discussed.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to thank the members of the Augmentative and Alternative Communication Research Group at Purdue University for their comments and suggestions throughout the course of this study.
Preparation of this paper was partially supported by a grant from the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services of the United States Department of Education (G008630079). However, the contents do not necessarily represent the policy of that agency and endorsement by the federal government is not to be assumed.
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