Effects of Speech Output Type, Message Length, and Reauditorization on Perceptions of the Communicative Competence of an Adult AAC User The effects of speech output type, aided message length, and partner reauditorization on naive observers’ perceptions of the communicative competence of an adult augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) system user were examined. Subjects consisted of 48 naive adults with minimal exposure to nonspeaking persons. Eight scripted videotaped conversational conditions involving ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1992
Effects of Speech Output Type, Message Length, and Reauditorization on Perceptions of the Communicative Competence of an Adult AAC User
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda A. Hoag
    Kansas State University, Manhattan
  • Jan L. Bedrosian
    Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada
  • Contact author: Linda A. Hoag, Department of Speech, 129 Nichols Hall, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Normal Language Processing / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1992
Effects of Speech Output Type, Message Length, and Reauditorization on Perceptions of the Communicative Competence of an Adult AAC User
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1363-1366. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1363
History: Received January 20, 1992 , Accepted June 24, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1363-1366. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1363
History: Received January 20, 1992; Accepted June 24, 1992

The effects of speech output type, aided message length, and partner reauditorization on naive observers’ perceptions of the communicative competence of an adult augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) system user were examined. Subjects consisted of 48 naive adults with minimal exposure to nonspeaking persons. Eight scripted videotaped conversational conditions involving an AAC user and a normal-speaking partner were employed in the manipulation of the three independent variables. A balanced incomplete block design was used. Following each viewing, subjects completed a questionnaire designed to assess the communicative competence of the AAC user. Results indicated a significant main effect for aided message length only. Ratings of the AAC user were higher in conditions with phrases than in conditions with single-word messages. Of interest was the finding that the use of digitized versus synthesized speech output had no effect on observer ratings. Clinical implications are discussed.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to express their sincere appreciation to Steve Calculator for his help in the conceptualization of this study, to Barry Molineux for his assistance with the communication devices, and to Dallas Johnson for statistical consulting. Thanks are also extended to the following people: Dick Hoag, Steve Pifer, Marian Bedrosian, Robert Roe, Mary Ann Scheneman, and Cindy Bimbaum.
The authors wish to express their equal participation in this project.
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