The Effects of Auditory and Visual Interference on Speech and Sign Hearing adults produced signed and spoken monologues under conditions of quiet or 80 dB SPL of noise and with their vision unobstructed or obstructed. Their signs were videotaped and a random sample of 24 frames was analyzed in each condition through a computer program that determined the overall distance of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1992
The Effects of Auditory and Visual Interference on Speech and Sign
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gerald M. Siegel
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • John L. Clay
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Susan L. Naeve
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1992
The Effects of Auditory and Visual Interference on Speech and Sign
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1358-1362. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1358
History: Received January 13, 1992 , Accepted June 2, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1358-1362. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1358
History: Received January 13, 1992; Accepted June 2, 1992

Hearing adults produced signed and spoken monologues under conditions of quiet or 80 dB SPL of noise and with their vision unobstructed or obstructed. Their signs were videotaped and a random sample of 24 frames was analyzed in each condition through a computer program that determined the overall distance of the hand from a marker placed on the signer's torso. Vocal intensity was digitized from the tape recordings and analyzed by computer for 1 min of continuous speech in each condition. The visual obstruction had no effect either on the distance of the signs or on the vocal intensity of their speech. The subjects increased vocal intensity by about 55% when the noise was introduced (the usual Lombard effect), but the noise had no effect on the distance of the signs. Sign performance was not influenced by visual feedback, and sign and speech were independent communication systems, even in bilingual speaking and signing subjects.

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