Evaluating Memory Wallets in Conversations With Persons With Dementia The use of memory wallets to self-prompt factual information during prompted conversations with familiar partners was evaluated for 9 subjects with dementia. Memory wallets contained 30 pictures and sentences about familiar persons, places, and events that each participant had difficulty remembering. The amount of training by caregivers was the one ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1992
Evaluating Memory Wallets in Conversations With Persons With Dementia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michelle S. Bourgeois
    University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1992
Evaluating Memory Wallets in Conversations With Persons With Dementia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1344-1357. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1344
History: Received October 24, 1991 , Accepted May 29, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1344-1357. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1344
History: Received October 24, 1991; Accepted May 29, 1992

The use of memory wallets to self-prompt factual information during prompted conversations with familiar partners was evaluated for 9 subjects with dementia. Memory wallets contained 30 pictures and sentences about familiar persons, places, and events that each participant had difficulty remembering. The amount of training by caregivers was the one component of the intervention package that varied among the nine attempts to replicate condition effects observed on introduction of the wallets. All subjects learned to use the memory wallets to improve their conversations by making more accurate factual statements. Even when caregiver training was not provided to 3 subjects, condition effects were still demonstrated, with only 1 subject requiring a brief orientation to his wallet. Long-term maintenance of condition effects was demonstrated for 3 subjects up to 30 months'postintervention. These results support the clinical utility of a memory wallet intervention package for persons with dementia and provide preliminary evidence that often little more than preparing memory wallets and providing a brief orientation are required to facilitate their use in improving conversations with familiar conversational partners.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Association Grant IIRG-88-078 to Eye and Ear Institute of Pittsburgh. The editorial comments of Howard Goldstein and the assistance of Lisa Mason are gratefully acknowledged.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access