Contextual and Linguistic Correlates of Intelligibility in Children With Developmental Phonological Disorders Listeners' glosses of children's intended words provided data for two studies of the potential influence of selected contextual and linguistic variables on word intelligibility. Several regularities associated with the occurrence of unintelligible words were identified. In Study I, intelligibility outcomes were associated with utterance length and fluency, word position, intelligibility ... Research Article
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Research Article  |   December 01, 1992
Contextual and Linguistic Correlates of Intelligibility in Children With Developmental Phonological Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Audrey D. Weston
    Idaho State University Pocatello, ID
  • Lawrence D. Shriberg
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1992
Contextual and Linguistic Correlates of Intelligibility in Children With Developmental Phonological Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1316-1332. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1316
History: Received September 25, 1991 , Accepted April 15, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1316-1332. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1316
History: Received September 25, 1991; Accepted April 15, 1992

Listeners' glosses of children's intended words provided data for two studies of the potential influence of selected contextual and linguistic variables on word intelligibility. Several regularities associated with the occurrence of unintelligible words were identified. In Study I, intelligibility outcomes were associated with utterance length and fluency, word position, intelligibility of adjacent words, phonological complexity, and grammatical form. In Study II, intelligibility outcomes were associated with phonological complexity, syllabic structure, and grammatical form. Discussion considers the implications of these and other regularities associated with the occurrence of unintelligible words for a comprehensive perspective on the utterance-to-utterance intelligibility deficits of children with phonological disorders of unknown origin.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a grant to the second author from the Public Health Service, NIDCD, Grant No. DC00496. We thank Joan Kwiatkowski for assistance in developing the analytic approach, Sara Hoffman and Amparo Ortez for compiling the distributional data, Doris Kistler for statistical consultation, and Lorraine Argyle and Dorothy Rorick for editorial assistance. We also wish to acknowledge the contributions of the anonymous editorial consultants to the final version of this manuscript.
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