Speaking Rates, Response Time Latencies, and Interrupting Behaviors of Young Stutterers, Nonstutterers, and Their Mothers The purpose of this study was to investigate the speaking rates, interrupting behaviors, and response time latencies (RTL) produced by stuttering and nonstuttering children and their mothers, and the relationship these three paralinguistic behaviors have to children’s speech disfluencies. Subjects were 13 boys who stutter (mean age= 4:0) and their ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1992
Speaking Rates, Response Time Latencies, and Interrupting Behaviors of Young Stutterers, Nonstutterers, and Their Mothers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ellen M. Kelly
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Edward G. Conture
    Syracuse University Syracuse, NY
  • Contact author: Ellen M. Kelly, PhD, Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Heavilon Hall, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907–1353.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1992
Speaking Rates, Response Time Latencies, and Interrupting Behaviors of Young Stutterers, Nonstutterers, and Their Mothers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1256-1267. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1256
History: Received December 4, 1991 , Accepted April 20, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1256-1267. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1256
History: Received December 4, 1991; Accepted April 20, 1992

The purpose of this study was to investigate the speaking rates, interrupting behaviors, and response time latencies (RTL) produced by stuttering and nonstuttering children and their mothers, and the relationship these three paralinguistic behaviors have to children’s speech disfluencies. Subjects were 13 boys who stutter (mean age= 4:0) and their mothers and 13 nonstuttering boys (mean age= 4:0) and their mothers. No significant differences were found between the two groups of children or between the two groups of mothers for any of the three paralinguistic behaviors with the exception that the mothers of nonstuttering children exhibited significantly (p< 0.01) faster rates of speech than either group of children. A strong positive correlation (r= .84) was found between stuttering children’s scores on the Stuttering Severity Instrument (Riley, 1980) and the durations of the overlapping portions of their mothers’ interruptions (i.e., their simultalk). Findings of this study are taken to support a facilitative demands-capacities model of conversational interaction in which mothers adjust the demands of their speaking models in response to their children’s demonstrated capacities for fluent speech production.

Acknowledgments
This research was completed as part of the first author’s doctoral dissertation and supported, in part, by OSEP field-initiated research grants (G008530252 and H023C80008) to Syracuse University, a SUNY-Geneseo Presidential Research Development Award, and a SUNY-Geneseo Foundation Incentive Grant. The authors extend their thanks to John Saxman and Mary Louise Edwards for their input during all phases of this research, John Gleason for his comments and suggestions regarding statistical analyses of the data, Linda Louko for her assistance with reliability measures, and Anne Smith for her helpful comments on a previous draft of this manuscript. We also extend our heartfelt appreciation to the 26 mother-child pairs who participated in this study. Portions of this research were presented at the annual meeting of the American Speech Language Hearing Association, Seattle, 1990.
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