Speech Breathing in Senescent and Younger Women During Oral Reading Breathing patterns in 20–30-year-old and 60–70-year-old women were recorded noninvasively during various nonspeech and oral reading tasks. On the nonspeech tasks, the only significant difference between groups was a smaller mean vital capacity for the older women. On oral reading, the older women had significantly greater means for absolute and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1992
Speech Breathing in Senescent and Younger Women During Oral Reading
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth E. Sperry
    Boston University Boston, MA
  • Richard J. Klich
    Kent State University Kent, OH
  • Contact author: Elizabeth E. Sperry, MA, Boston University, Department of Communication Disorders, Sargent College, 635 Commonwealth Avenue, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02215.
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Normal Language Processing / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1992
Speech Breathing in Senescent and Younger Women During Oral Reading
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1246-1255. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1246
History: Received June 10, 1991 , Accepted March 27, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1246-1255. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1246
History: Received June 10, 1991; Accepted March 27, 1992

Breathing patterns in 20–30-year-old and 60–70-year-old women were recorded noninvasively during various nonspeech and oral reading tasks. On the nonspeech tasks, the only significant difference between groups was a smaller mean vital capacity for the older women. On oral reading, the older women had significantly greater means for absolute and relative inhalatory volumes, relative inhalatory airflow rates, absolute and relative volumes during nonphonatory exhalations, and relative exhalatory volumes. No significant mean differences between groups were found on absolute inhalatory airflow rates, absolute exhalatory volumes during speech, and absolute and relative exhalatory airflow rates. In both age groups, increases in sentence length were associated with significantly increased inhalatory and exhalatory volumes but mean airflow rates were not significantly affected by sentence length. Some differential effects of reading context on only the older group seemed to represent additional demands placed on their respiratory systems for speech breathing.

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