Tongue Strength and Endurance Relation to Highly Skilled Movements Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1992
Tongue Strength and Endurance
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donald A. Robin
    Laboratory of Speech and Language Neuroscience Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology and National Center for Voice and Speech University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Anuj Goel
    Laboratory of Speech and Language Neuroscience Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology and National Center for Voice and Speech University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Lori B. Somodi
    Laboratory of Speech and Language Neuroscience Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology and National Center for Voice and Speech University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Erich S. Luschei
    Laboratory of Speech and Language Neuroscience Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology and National Center for Voice and Speech University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Contact author: Donald A. Robins, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Wendell Johnson Speech and Hearing Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1992
Tongue Strength and Endurance
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1239-1245. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1239
History: Received November 8, 1991 , Accepted March 23, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1239-1245. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1239
History: Received November 8, 1991; Accepted March 23, 1992

Tongue strength and endurance (fatigue) were examined in subjects who have acquired high skill levels with their tongues (supranormal) and in subjects who use the tongue normally. The supranormal groups were trumpet players and high school debaters who were able to speak intelligibly at rates much faster than normal. Hand strength and fatigue were also assessed. Maximal strength was measured by recording how much pressure an individual could exert on an air-filled bulb. Endurance was measured by determining how long subjects could sustain 50% of their maximal pressure. Results showed that maximal strength of the tongue and hand did not differentiate the supranormal subjects from the normal subjects. Hand endurance did not differentiate the subjects either. However, the supranormal groups had significantly longer tongue endurance times than did the normal subjects.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by NIDCD grant No. 1 R03 DC01182-1. We thank the subjects for their willingness to participate in the study. Sincere appreciation is extended to Paula Altmaier, Carlin Hagemann, Daryl Lorell, and Nancy Solomon for comments on an earlier version of the manuscript. Thanks are also extended to Colleen Gardner for her secretarial support.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access