Disfluencies in the Conversations of Young Children Who Stutter Some Answers About Questions Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1992
Disfluencies in the Conversations of Young Children Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amy L. Weiss
    University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Patricia M. Zebrowski
    University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Contact author: Amy L. Weiss, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Normal Language Processing / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1992
Disfluencies in the Conversations of Young Children Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1230-1238. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1230
History: Received July 29, 1991 , Accepted March 24, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1230-1238. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1230
History: Received July 29, 1991; Accepted March 24, 1992

Parents of children who stutter are often advised to reduce the number of questions they ask their children. Implicit in this advice is the assumption that children who stutter will be more disfluent when answering questions. This study assessed parent-child conversational speech for 8 parent-child pairs to determine the relative amounts of disfluency in the child’s responses to questions versus making assertions. Length and complexity of the children’s utterances and the frequency of the parents’ requests by level of demand were also evaluated.

Results suggested that the responses made by the children to their parents’ requests were significantly less likely to contain disfluencies than were their assertions. Also, longer and more complex utterances were more likely to contain disfluencies, regardless of their designation as assertions or responses. Parents were shown to favor request types of lower levels of demand in conversations. Requests posed with greater levels of demand were somewhat more likely to yield disfluent responses than were those at a lower demand level.

Acknowledgments
We wish to thank Colleen Gardner for her assistance with typing the final draft of this manuscript. Mario Robinson, who served as a graduate assistant to the first author, is also acknowledged for her time and efforts. Finally, we are very grateful to associate editor Dale Evan Metz and editorial consultants Barry Guitar and Janis Costello Ingham, who provided us with many thoughtful and helpful comments following the careful readings of the manuscript.
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