Gradations in a Pattern of Neuromuscular Activity Associated With Stuttering EMGs were recorded from muscles of the lip, jaw, and neck during conversational speech of 17 stuttering subjects. Averaged power spectra and coherence between pairs of EMGs were computed. Results indicate that tremorlike oscillations in the range of 5–15 Hz and high amplitudes of EMGs occupy a common continuum of ... Research Article
EDITOR'S AWARD
Research Article  |   December 01, 1992
Gradations in a Pattern of Neuromuscular Activity Associated With Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Margaret Denny
    Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Anne Smith
    Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: Anne Smith, PhD, Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1992
Gradations in a Pattern of Neuromuscular Activity Associated With Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1216-1229. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1216
History: Received September 17, 1991 , Accepted March 19, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1216-1229. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1216
History: Received September 17, 1991; Accepted March 19, 1992

EMGs were recorded from muscles of the lip, jaw, and neck during conversational speech of 17 stuttering subjects. Averaged power spectra and coherence between pairs of EMGs were computed. Results indicate that tremorlike oscillations in the range of 5–15 Hz and high amplitudes of EMGs occupy a common continuum of motor patterns that may occur in stuttering. In subjects whose results fell at the strong end of this continuum, stuttered speech was distinguished by widely distributed, high-amplitude oscillations and relatively high coherence at the frequency of oscillation. At the other extreme, neither oscillatory activity nor amplitude was greater for stuttered speech; in fact stuttered and fluent speech were often associated with approximately equal EMG amplitude. These results suggest that there is not a single set of physiological events that uniformly characterize stuttering in all individuals; rather, events such as the occurrence of high-amplitude oscillations occur at different strengths in different individuals.

Acknowledgments
The authors are indebted to Clare McGillem for his thoughtful assistance concerning techniques of signal processing. We thank Jennifer Wood for her contribution to analyzing these data. This work was supported by a grant from the NIH’s National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, DC00559.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access