Glottal Gap Configurations in Two Age Groups of Women The purpose of this study was to gather data on glottal gap configurations in two age groups of women. Using videostroboscopy, glottal closure patterns of 20 women (10 young, 10 elderly) were observed across nine pitch/loudness conditions. While both young and elderly speakers displayed a high incidence of glottal gaps, ... Speech: Articles and Reports
Speech: Articles and Reports  |   December 1992
Glottal Gap Configurations in Two Age Groups of Women
 
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  • © 1992, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody
Speech: Articles and Reports   |   December 1992
Glottal Gap Configurations in Two Age Groups of Women
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1209-1215. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1209
History: Received September 30, 1991 , Accepted March 3, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1209-1215. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1209
History: Received September 30, 1991; Accepted March 3, 1992

The purpose of this study was to gather data on glottal gap configurations in two age groups of women. Using videostroboscopy, glottal closure patterns of 20 women (10 young, 10 elderly) were observed across nine pitch/loudness conditions. While both young and elderly speakers displayed a high incidence of glottal gaps, the two groups differed markedly in the configuration of the gaps observed and in the phonatory conditions under which gaps were observed. Young speakers demonstrated posterior chink and incomplete closure significantly more frequently than elderly women, although rarely demonstrating anterior gap or spindle configuration. In contrast, anterior gap was the single most common type of gap in the elderly, with spindle also occurring significantly more frequently. Individual elderly speakers, overall, changed glottic configuration more frequently across phonatory conditions than did young speakers. Some individual elderly speakers tended to vary glottic configuration consistently with pitch level changes.

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