Oral Motor Control, Posturing, and Myofunctional Variables in 8-Year-Olds One hundred thirty-three rural second graders were evaluated for diadochokinetic abilities and myofunctional variables. Single-syllable diadochokinetic rates were significantly correlated with open-mouth resting postures. Slow trisyllable diadochokinetic rates were significantly correlated with a dentalized resting tongue posture and dentalized swallow patterns. The implications of these relationships are discussed. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1992
Oral Motor Control, Posturing, and Myofunctional Variables in 8-Year-Olds
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sue T. Hale
    The University of Mississippi University, MS
  • Gloria D. Kellum
    The University of Mississippi University, MS
  • John F. Richardson
    The University of Mississippi University, MS
  • Stephen C. Messer
    The University of Mississippi University, MS
  • Alan M. Gross
    The University of Mississippi University, MS
  • Siphan Sisakun
    The University of Mississippi University, MS
  • Contact author: Sue T. Hale, MCD, Department of Communicative Disorders, The University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677.
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1992
Oral Motor Control, Posturing, and Myofunctional Variables in 8-Year-Olds
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1203-1208. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1203
History: Received March 4, 1991 , Accepted January 16, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1992, Vol. 35, 1203-1208. doi:10.1044/jshr.3506.1203
History: Received March 4, 1991; Accepted January 16, 1992

One hundred thirty-three rural second graders were evaluated for diadochokinetic abilities and myofunctional variables. Single-syllable diadochokinetic rates were significantly correlated with open-mouth resting postures. Slow trisyllable diadochokinetic rates were significantly correlated with a dentalized resting tongue posture and dentalized swallow patterns. The implications of these relationships are discussed.

The Authors wish to thank the faculty, staff and students of Bramlett Elementary School, Oxford, Misfor their cooperation with this study.This project was supported in part by a grant from the National Institutes of Health #DE08641.
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