Effects of Vocal Task and Respiratory Phase on Prephonatory Chest Wall Movements A vocal reaction time paradigm was used to explore prephonatory respiratory kinematics. Movements of the rib cage and abdomen were recorded prior to production of utterances differing in length and intensity, and vocal responses were elicited in different phases and volumes of the quiet breathing cycle. A velocity threshold was ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1992
Effects of Vocal Task and Respiratory Phase on Prephonatory Chest Wall Movements
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David H. McFarland
    Ecole d’orthophonie et d’audiologie et Centre de recherche en sciences neurologiques Université de Montréal Montréal, Canada
  • Anne Smith
    Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: David H. McFarland, Ecole d’orthophonie et d’audiologie, Faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succursale A, Montrbal, Canada H3C 3J7.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1992
Effects of Vocal Task and Respiratory Phase on Prephonatory Chest Wall Movements
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 971-982. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.971
History: Received June 14, 1991 , Accepted December 19, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 971-982. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.971
History: Received June 14, 1991; Accepted December 19, 1991

A vocal reaction time paradigm was used to explore prephonatory respiratory kinematics. Movements of the rib cage and abdomen were recorded prior to production of utterances differing in length and intensity, and vocal responses were elicited in different phases and volumes of the quiet breathing cycle. A velocity threshold was used to distinguish prephonatory adjustments from the cyclical movements of the chest wall that are characteristic of quiet breathing. The results suggest that a variety of prephonatory kinematic events can occur prior to initiation of vocalization in response to a stimulus. Further, prephonatory movements appear to be adaptive in that they are influenced by the length of the utterance to be spoken and the respiratory volume at the time of voice initiation.

Acknowledgments
We would like to thank Christine M. Weber for her contributions to this paper. This work was supported in part by grant DC00559 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders and a grant from the Medical Research Council of Canada.
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