The Role of Spectral and Temporal Cues in Vowel Identification by Listeners With Impaired Hearing This study examined the use of duration and formant frequency in the labeling of synthetic CVC stimuli forming a beet-bit continuum. Durational and F2 frequency cues to vowel identity varied systematically across stimuli. Subjects with normal hearing tended to rely primarily on F2 frequency in vowel labeling, whereas subjects with ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1992
The Role of Spectral and Temporal Cues in Vowel Identification by Listeners With Impaired Hearing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • W. Van Summers
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center Washington, DC
  • Marjorie R. Leek
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center Washington, DC
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1992
The Role of Spectral and Temporal Cues in Vowel Identification by Listeners With Impaired Hearing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 1189-1199. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.1189
History: Received December 15, 1991 , Accepted March 17, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 1189-1199. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.1189
History: Received December 15, 1991; Accepted March 17, 1992

This study examined the use of duration and formant frequency in the labeling of synthetic CVC stimuli forming a beet-bit continuum. Durational and F2 frequency cues to vowel identity varied systematically across stimuli. Subjects with normal hearing tended to rely primarily on F2 frequency in vowel labeling, whereas subjects with impaired hearing relied less on F2 information. This group difference was observed even for stimuli with large F2 differences, which were easily discriminated by all subjects. The effect of vowel duration on labeling was similar for both groups, with long-duration stimuli receiving more "beet" responses than short-duration stimuli across the F2 range. Psychoacoustic measures of frequency resolution and temporal resolution were poor predictors of a subject’s use of formant information and duration information in labeling.

Acknowledgments
Support for this research was provided by NIH grant DC 00626 and by the Department of Clinical Investigation, Walter Reed Army Medical Center. All subjects provided written consent before participating in the study. The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense.
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