Discovery and Expository Methods in Teaching Visual Consonant and Word Identification An experiment was conducted to examine the processes involved in lipreading as well as to investigate an optimal approach to teaching lipreading skill. We compared discovery and expository methods of learning to lip-read. Twenty-six college students with normal hearing were trained over 3 days to lip-read consonant-vowel (CV) syllables. The ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1992
Discovery and Expository Methods in Teaching Visual Consonant and Word Identification
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Antoinette T. Gesi
    University of California Santa Cruz
  • Dominic W. Massaro
    University of California Santa Cruz
  • Michael M. Cohen
    University of California Santa Cruz
  • Contact author: Dominic W. Masaro, PhD, Program in Experimental Psychology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1992
Discovery and Expository Methods in Teaching Visual Consonant and Word Identification
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 1180-1188. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.1180
History: Received April 1, 1991 , Accepted March 17, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 1180-1188. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.1180
History: Received April 1, 1991; Accepted March 17, 1992

An experiment was conducted to examine the processes involved in lipreading as well as to investigate an optimal approach to teaching lipreading skill. We compared discovery and expository methods of learning to lip-read. Twenty-six college students with normal hearing were trained over 3 days to lip-read consonant-vowel (CV) syllables. The training material consisted of a prerecorded videotape of four different talkers. The task was a forced-choice procedure with feedback. Subjects learned with training, but there was no difference between the two learning methods. As a retention measure, subjects returned 4 weeks later and repeated the training. There were significant savings of the original learning. Three weeks after the retention phase, subjects were tested with a 10-item forced-choice monosyllabic word task. Those subjects who had extensive training on CV syllables did no better on identifying the monosyllabic words than did a control group of 9 subjects with no training. Nevertheless, performance for all three groups (discovery, expository, and no training) improved during training in the word identification task.

Acknowledgment
The research reported in this paper and the writing of the paper were supported, in part, by grants from the Public Health Service (PHS R01 NS 20314), the National Science Foundation (BNS 8812728), a James McKeen Cattell Fellowship, and the graduate division of the University of California, Santa Cruz. We thank Carol Lee De Filippo, Al Montgomery, and an anonymous reviewer for comments on the article.
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