Masking of Tinnitus Induced by Sound Two experiments were performed in which 8 listeners used external sound to mask the tinnitus induced by a 95-dB SPL tone presented for 1 min. Wider bandwidth noises were more effective maskers than noises of critical bandwidth, which, in turn, were more effective than tonal maskers. Contralateral maskers were often ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1992
Masking of Tinnitus Induced by Sound
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Simon Kemp
    University of Canterbury New Zealand
  • Richard N. George
    University of Canterbury New Zealand
  • Contact author: Simon Kemp, Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 1, New Zealand.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1992
Masking of Tinnitus Induced by Sound
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 1169-1179. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.1169
History: Received July 15, 1991 , Accepted February 20, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 1169-1179. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.1169
History: Received July 15, 1991; Accepted February 20, 1992

Two experiments were performed in which 8 listeners used external sound to mask the tinnitus induced by a 95-dB SPL tone presented for 1 min. Wider bandwidth noises were more effective maskers than noises of critical bandwidth, which, in turn, were more effective than tonal maskers. Contralateral maskers were often effective, but less so than ipsilateral maskers. Tuning curves showed some degree of frequency specificity that was not related to the frequency of the tinnitus-inducing tone. There were consistent and pronounced differences between individual listeners. Overall, our results indicate both similarities and differences between the masking of induced tinnitus and the masking of pathological tinnitus.

Acknowledgments
We dedicate this paper to the memory of Eberhard Zwicker. The work was supported by a grant from the Deafness Research Foundation of New Zealand. We also acknowledge equipment loaned from the National Audiology Centre. We are grateful to the helpful comments of Michael Gorga and two anonymous reviewers of an earlier version of this paper.
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