The Role of Localization in Visual Reinforcement Audiometry The response task employed in visual reinforcement audiometry (VRA) has been characterized both as a localization response and, alternatively, as a pure operant conditioning behavior independent of localization. This study examined the role of localization in VRA conditioning and threshold procedures by varying the localization information provided to normal infants. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1992
The Role of Localization in Visual Reinforcement Audiometry
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael A. Primus
    University of Wyoming Laramie
  • Contact author: Michael A. Primus, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Box 3311, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071.
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1992
The Role of Localization in Visual Reinforcement Audiometry
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 1137-1141. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.1137
History: Received September 23, 1991 , Accepted January 23, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 1137-1141. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.1137
History: Received September 23, 1991; Accepted January 23, 1992

The response task employed in visual reinforcement audiometry (VRA) has been characterized both as a localization response and, alternatively, as a pure operant conditioning behavior independent of localization. This study examined the role of localization in VRA conditioning and threshold procedures by varying the localization information provided to normal infants. Results indicate (a) that the VRA response is not contingent on localization but (b) that performance may be significantly influenced by localization. The findings suggest that any variable that alters proper localization cues, including equipment arrangement or impaired auditory function, may degrade response performance.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported in part by funding from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation. The author wishes to recognize Susan Whaley and A. Gene Klemt for their assistance on this project.
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