Variables Influencing Perceptions of the Communicative Competence of an Adult Augmentative and Alternative Communication System User The effects of aided message length, partner reauditorization, and observer background on perceptions of the communicative competence of an adult augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) system user were examined. Two groups of subjects participated: naive adults with minimal exposure to nonspeaking persons, and speech-language pathologists currently working with AAC users. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1992
Variables Influencing Perceptions of the Communicative Competence of an Adult Augmentative and Alternative Communication System User
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jan L. Bedrosian
    Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada
  • Linda A. Hoag
    Kansas State University Manhattan
  • Stephen N. Calculator
    University of New Hampshire Durham
  • Barry Molineux
    The Capper Foundation Topeka, KS
  • Contact author: Jan L. Bedrosian, PhD, School of Human Communication Disorders, Dalhousie University, 5599 Fenwick Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 1 R2, Canada.
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Normal Language Processing / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1992
Variables Influencing Perceptions of the Communicative Competence of an Adult Augmentative and Alternative Communication System User
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 1105-1113. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.1105
History: Received February 7, 1991 , Accepted February 3, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 1105-1113. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.1105
History: Received February 7, 1991; Accepted February 3, 1992

The effects of aided message length, partner reauditorization, and observer background on perceptions of the communicative competence of an adult augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) system user were examined. Two groups of subjects participated: naive adults with minimal exposure to nonspeaking persons, and speech-language pathologists currently working with AAC users. Four scripted videotaped conversational conditions involving an AAC user and a normally speaking partner were employed to manipulate aided message length and partner reauditorization. A balanced incomplete block design was used. Following each viewing, subjects completed a questionnaire designed to assess the communicative competence of the AAC user. Results indicated a significant interaction effect involving subject group and aided message length. The speech-language pathologists were affected by aidedmessage length. Furthermore, significant differences between subject groups were found inspecific conditions. Future research directions are discussed.

This project was funded in part by a BGR grant from Kansas State University. Funding was also provided by the School of Human Communication Disorders at Dalhousie University and the Depart‐merit of Speech at Kansas State University. The authors wish to express their sincere appreciation to Don Hoyt for his expertise and help in both conceptualization of the project and questionnaire development, and to Dallas Johnson, Joy Armson, and Deepthi Jayawardene for their expert statistical consulting on the project. Thanks are also extended to Steve Pifer, Dick Hoag, Robert Roe, and Linda Holdeman for their assistance on the project; to Caroline Salva Romero for data preparation; to the adults who participated as raters; and to Carol Keefe, Donna Currie, Sherida Hassanali, Rachel Caissie, and Wayne Zelmer for manuscript preparation. Finally, we wish to thank Holly Craig and Marilyn Nippold for their constructive input regarding this manuscript.
The first two authors (Jan L. Bedrosian and Linda A. Hoag) participated equally in the project discussed in this paper.
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