Intelligibility Assessment in Developmental Phonological Disorders Accuracy of Caregiver Gloss Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1992
Intelligibility Assessment in Developmental Phonological Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joan Kwiatkowski
    Department of Communicative Disorders and The Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Lawrence D. Shriberg
    Department of Communicative Disorders and The Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Contact authors: Joan Kwiatkowski or Lawrence D. Shriberg, Phonology Project, The Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1992
Intelligibility Assessment in Developmental Phonological Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 1095-1104. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.1095
History: Received June 3, 1991 , Accepted January 31, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 1095-1104. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.1095
History: Received June 3, 1991; Accepted January 31, 1992

Fifteen caregivers each glossed a simultaneously videotaped and audiotaped sample of their child with speech delay engaged in conversation with a clinician. One of the authors generated a reference gloss for each sample, aided by (a) prior knowledge of the child’s speech-language status and error patterns, (b) glosses from the child’s clinician and the child’s caregiver, (c) unlimited replays of the taped sample, and (d) the information gained from completing a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample. Caregivers glossed an average of 78 of the utterances and 81 of the words. A comparison of their glosses to the reference glosses suggested that they accurately understood an average of 58 of the utterances and 73 of the words. Discussion considers the implications of such findings for methodological and theoretical issues underlying children’s moment-to-moment intelligibility breakdowns during speech-language processing.

Acknowledgments
This research was funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health, NIDCD, Grant No. DC00496. We thank Tammie Brochtrup, Cindy Campbell, Kirsten Curtis, Greta French, Karin Jones, Amy Knoeck, Lisa Kostka, Kris Krajewski, Susan Tachibana, Denise Timmer, and Lauren Walker for obtaining representative speech samples and providing the clinicians’ glosses. We also thank the parents and children who participated in the study. Finally, special thanks to Dorothy Rorick for her editorial assistance and to Carol Stoel-Gammon, Shelley L. Velleman, and two anonymous JSHR reviewers for their cogent editorial suggestions.
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