Linguistic Trade-Offs in School-Age Children With and Without Language Disorders Factors influencing the occurrence of trade-off effects among linguistic components were examined. Several linguistic measures were used to represent syntactic and phonological production in order to determine whether interrelationship patterns would vary across measures. Linguistic interactions present in imitated speech were compared to those from spontaneous speech. Group effects were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1992
Linguistic Trade-Offs in School-Age Children With and Without Language Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie J. Masterson
    Arizona State University Tempe
  • Alan G. Kamhi
    Memphis State University Memphis, TN
  • Contact author: Julie Masterson, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, Southwest Missouri State University, 901 South National, Springfield, MO 65804.
Article Information
Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1992
Linguistic Trade-Offs in School-Age Children With and Without Language Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 1064-1075. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.1064
History: Received February 11, 1991 , Accepted November 25, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 1064-1075. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.1064
History: Received February 11, 1991; Accepted November 25, 1991

Factors influencing the occurrence of trade-off effects among linguistic components were examined. Several linguistic measures were used to represent syntactic and phonological production in order to determine whether interrelationship patterns would vary across measures. Linguistic interactions present in imitated speech were compared to those from spontaneous speech. Group effects were explored by comparing data from children with language-learning disabilities, children with reading disabilities, and normally developing children. Results indicated trade-offs between some linguistic measures and positive relationships among others. More trade-offs were present in imitated speech than in spontaneous utterances. In general, interrelationship patterns were similar across groups. Interpretation of these results in reference to current models of sentence production is offered.

Acknowledgments
We appreciate the comments and suggestions on this manuscript provided by Carol Stoel-Gammon, Stephen Camarata, and John Panagos. We are grateful to Ann Carpenter and the Marion Public Schools for their assistance in obtaining subjects. Thanks also goes to Julie Cook, John Richardson, and Susan Terwilliger for their assistance in reliability checks. An earlier version of this paper was presented at the 1985 Symposium on Research in Child Language Disorders in Madison, Wisconsin.
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