The Conditions and Course of Clinically Induced Phonological Change This two-part study continued the evaluation of minimal pair treatment in phonological change (Gierut, 1989,  1990, 1991a; Gierut & Neumann, 1992). Three linguistic variables relevant to change were experimentally manipulated within an alternating treatments design to determine specifically the interplay of a maximal number of feature distinctions, feature class, and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1992
The Conditions and Course of Clinically Induced Phonological Change
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Judith A. Gierut
    Indiana University Bloomington
  • Contact author: Judith A. Gierut, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1992
The Conditions and Course of Clinically Induced Phonological Change
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 1049-1063. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.1049
History: Received February 15, 1991 , Accepted October 24, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 1049-1063. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.1049
History: Received February 15, 1991; Accepted October 24, 1991

This two-part study continued the evaluation of minimal pair treatment in phonological change (Gierut, 1989,  1990, 1991a; Gierut & Neumann, 1992). Three linguistic variables relevant to change were experimentally manipulated within an alternating treatments design to determine specifically the interplay of a maximal number of feature distinctions, feature class, and relationship of treated phonemes to a child's grammar in inducing sound change. The conditions of treatment that were shown to facilitate optimal phonological change in previous research were again experimentally replicated. Specifically, minimal pairs comparing two phonemes previously unknown to a child that also differed by maximal and major class features were found to be the preferred context motivating change. Important individual differences emerged and underscored the role of a child's pretreatment grammar in phonological change. These differences contributed to descriptions of possible courses of change followed by children with phonological disorders and bear upon the predictability of change and the effectiveness of treatments that may condition change.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health (DC 00433) and the Biomedical Research Support Grant Program (S07 RR 7031K) to Indiana University, Bloomington. I would like especially to thank Steve Chin, Phil Connell, Stuart Davis, and Dan Dinnsen for many productive discussions throughout this project. Carol Stoel-Gammon, Jan Ingham, and an anonymous JSHR reviewer also provided valuable comments. The Clinical Faculty of the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at Indiana University assisted with subject identification; Melissa Knoll provided clinical treatment; Faith Salesin and Christina Simmerman served as reliability judges; Christina Simmerman also assisted with data management and analysis.
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