Fundamental Frequency, Jitter, and Shimmer in Preschoolers Who Stutter This investigation examined acoustic correlates of phonatory control in the speech of 10 preschool-aged boys who were stutterers (mean age= 45 months) recorded relatively close to the time of stuttering onset and in the speech of 10 boys who were nonstutterers (mean age= 46 months). For each subject, acoustic measurements ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1992
Fundamental Frequency, Jitter, and Shimmer in Preschoolers Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kelly Dailey Hall
    Northern Illinois University De Kalb
  • Ehud Yairi
    University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
  • Contact author: Kelly Dailey Hall, PhD, Northern Illinois University, Department of Communicative Disorders, De Kalb, IL 60115.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1992
Fundamental Frequency, Jitter, and Shimmer in Preschoolers Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 1002-1008. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.1002
History: Received May 20, 1991 , Accepted January 21, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1992, Vol. 35, 1002-1008. doi:10.1044/jshr.3505.1002
History: Received May 20, 1991; Accepted January 21, 1992

This investigation examined acoustic correlates of phonatory control in the speech of 10 preschool-aged boys who were stutterers (mean age= 45 months) recorded relatively close to the time of stuttering onset and in the speech of 10 boys who were nonstutterers (mean age= 46 months). For each subject, acoustic measurements of fundamental frequency, jitter, and shimmer were extracted from the 100 msec midportion of 30 vowels selected from fluent utterances in spontaneous speech. Significant differences between the two groups for shimmer measures are among the few positive findings in recent publications concerning the fluent speech of children who stutter.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by grant #ROIDC00459 from the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders. Principal investigator, Ehud Yairi. The authors wish to thank the University of Chicago Center for Speech and Swallowing Disorders for use of its laboratory facilities during the latter stages of this project.
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