Detection and Recognition of Stop Consonants by Normal.Hearing and Hearing Impaired Listeners This study examined the possibility that hearing-impaired listeners, in addition to displaying poorer-than-normal recognition of speech presented in background noise, require a larger signal-to-noise ratio for the detection of the speech sounds. Psychometric functions for the detection and recognition of stop consonants were obtained from both normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1992
Detection and Recognition of Stop Consonants by Normal.Hearing and Hearing Impaired Listeners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christopher W. Turner
    Communication Sciences and Disorders Syracuse University Syracuse, NY
  • David A. Fabry
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN
  • Stephanie Barrett
    Communication Sciences and Disorders Syracuse University Syracuse, NY
  • Amy R. Horwitz
    Communication Sciences and Disorders Syracuse University Syracuse, NY
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1992
Detection and Recognition of Stop Consonants by Normal.Hearing and Hearing Impaired Listeners
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1992, Vol. 35, 942-949. doi:10.1044/jshr.3504.942
History: Received July 1, 1991 , Accepted January 2, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1992, Vol. 35, 942-949. doi:10.1044/jshr.3504.942
History: Received July 1, 1991; Accepted January 2, 1992

This study examined the possibility that hearing-impaired listeners, in addition to displaying poorer-than-normal recognition of speech presented in background noise, require a larger signal-to-noise ratio for the detection of the speech sounds. Psychometric functions for the detection and recognition of stop consonants were obtained from both normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners. Expressing the speech levels in terms of their short-term spectra, the detection of consonants for both subject groups occurred at the same signal-to-noise ratio. In contrast, the hearing-impaired listeners displayed poorer recognition performance than the normal-hearing listeners. These results imply that the higher signal-to-noise ratios required for a given level of recognition by some subjects with hearing loss are not due in part to a deficit in detection of the signals in the masking noise, but rather are due exclusively to a deficit in recognition.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by grant DC00377 from the National Institute on Deafness and other Communicative Disorders. Special thanks to Marjorie Leek and an anonymous reviewer who provided many helpful comments on an earlier version of the manuscript.
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