The Development and Cross-Validation of a Self-Report Inventory to Assess Pure-Tone Threshold Hearing Sensitivity Previous attempts to assess hearing loss by means of self-report survey items have shown only low to moderate correlations with actual audiometric measures, probably because these attempts used items with high face validity rather than laboratory-tested validity. Beginning with a pool of 108 items used with 384 individuals, we developed ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1992
The Development and Cross-Validation of a Self-Report Inventory to Assess Pure-Tone Threshold Hearing Sensitivity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stanley Coren
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
  • A. Ralph Hakstian
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1992
The Development and Cross-Validation of a Self-Report Inventory to Assess Pure-Tone Threshold Hearing Sensitivity
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1992, Vol. 35, 921-928. doi:10.1044/jshr.3504.921
History: Received June 12, 1991 , Accepted November 4, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1992, Vol. 35, 921-928. doi:10.1044/jshr.3504.921
History: Received June 12, 1991; Accepted November 4, 1991

Previous attempts to assess hearing loss by means of self-report survey items have shown only low to moderate correlations with actual audiometric measures, probably because these attempts used items with high face validity rather than laboratory-tested validity. Beginning with a pool of 108 items used with 384 individuals, we developed a self-report inventory (see Appendix) suitable for group testing or survey administration, which appears to have high correlation with pure-tone hearing thresholds. The inventory was then cross-validated against laboratory audiometric measures in a separate sample of 422 subjects. The resulting 12-item Hearing Screening Inventory (HSI) was shown to be reliable with an internal consistency coefficient (alpha) of 0.89 and test-retest stability coefficient of 0.88. The correlation between pure-tone hearing thresholds in the better ear and the HSI scores for the combined samples was r = 0.81. The correct classification rate for the HSI was 92.1% for a low fence of 25-dB hearing level and 93.4% for a high fence of 55-dB hearing level. A conversion equation with estimated variability is also provided for point estimates of pure-tone hearing thresholds from the HSI scores. A copy of the inventory and scoring procedure is appended to this report.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by grants from the British Columbia Health Care Research Foundation, the Medical Research Council of Canada, and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.
The authors would like to acknowledge the assistance of Wayne Wong, David Wong, Tania Jackson, Joan Coren, Geof Donelly, Lynda Berger, Steve Park, Debbie Aks, and Dereck Atha, who assisted in the collection of data.
The Hearing Screening Inventory is copyrighted by SC Psychological Enterprises Ltd., and reprinted by permission. It may be reproduced for research purposes only. We would appreciate receipt of copies of any data collected using this instrument, because we are trying to establish population norms to assist researchers in interpretation of data collected with the HSI.
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