Age-Related Differences in Processing Dynamic Information to Identify Vowel Quality This study examined age-related differences in the use of dynamic acoustic information (in the form of formant transitions) to identify vowel quality in CVCs. Two versions of 61 naturally produced, commonly occurring, monosyllabic English words were created: a control version (the unmodified whole word) and a silent-center version (in which ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1992
Age-Related Differences in Processing Dynamic Information to Identify Vowel Quality
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert Allen Fox
    Division of Speech and Hearing Science The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Lida G. Wall
    Division of Speech and Hearing Science The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Jeanne Gokcen
    Division of Speech and Hearing Science The Ohio State University, Columbus
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1992
Age-Related Differences in Processing Dynamic Information to Identify Vowel Quality
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1992, Vol. 35, 892-902. doi:10.1044/jshr.3504.892
History: Received March 19, 1991 , Accepted August 26, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1992, Vol. 35, 892-902. doi:10.1044/jshr.3504.892
History: Received March 19, 1991; Accepted August 26, 1991

This study examined age-related differences in the use of dynamic acoustic information (in the form of formant transitions) to identify vowel quality in CVCs. Two versions of 61 naturally produced, commonly occurring, monosyllabic English words were created: a control version (the unmodified whole word) and a silent-center version (in which approximately 62% of the medial vowel was replaced by silence). A group of normal-hearing young adults (19–25 years old) and older adults (61–75 years old) identified these tokens. The older subjects were found to be significantly worse than the younger subjects at identifying the medial vowel and the initial and final consonants in the silent-center condition. These results support the hypothesis of an age-related decrement in the ability to process dynamic perceptual cues in the perception of vowel quality.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported in part by a grant from the National Institute on Aging (#5R01 AG08353–02). The authors would like to thank Darlene Moenter and Susan Dalebout for their help in identifying and running subjects in this experiment. We would also like to thank Diane Kewley-Port and two anonymous reviewers for very valuable suggestions on the revision of this manuscript.
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