Sources of Variability in Speechreading Sentences A Generalizability Analysis Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1992
Sources of Variability in Speechreading Sentences
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marilyn E. Demorest
    University of Maryland, Baltimore County
  • Lynne E. Bernstein
    Gallaudet University Washington, DC
Article Information
Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1992
Sources of Variability in Speechreading Sentences
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1992, Vol. 35, 876-891. doi:10.1044/jshr.3504.876
History: Received May 16, 1991 , Accepted October 14, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1992, Vol. 35, 876-891. doi:10.1044/jshr.3504.876
History: Received May 16, 1991; Accepted October 14, 1991

Generalizability theory (Cronbach, Gleser, Nanda, & Rajaratnam, 1972) was used to estimate the percentage of variance explained by three sources of variability in speechreading sentences: the subject, the talker, and the sentence materials. Videodisc recordings of the 100 CID Everyday Sentences (Davis & Silverman, 1970), spoken by a male and a female talker, were presented to 104 subjects with normal hearing. For performance on individual sentences (total number of words correct), the most important systematic sources of variability were the sentence (26.3%), the speechreader (10.5%), the talker (4.9%), and the interaction of talker and sentence (5.1%). Residual error accounted for 51.2% of the variance. Generalizability functions are presented, as a function of test length, for five models of test administration and interpretation. For 10-, 50-, and 100-item lists, generalizability is predicted to be .70, .92, and .96, respectively, for a single talker. Psychometric characteristics of these recordings of the CID sentences are also presented.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by NINCDS Grant NS22308 to The Johns Hopkins University and NIDCD Grant DC00695 to Gallaudet University. Portions of these data were presented at the 114th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America in Miami, FL, November 17, 1987.
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