Instructing Facilitators to Support the Communication of People Who Use Augmentative Communication Systems A single-subject multiple-baseline design, replicated across three dyads, was used to examine the efficacy of instructing facilitators (i.e., significant others) to promote communication with people who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems. Facilitators were instructed in four 1-hour sessions to decrease their conversational control and provide more opportunities for ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1992
Instructing Facilitators to Support the Communication of People Who Use Augmentative Communication Systems
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Janice Light
    Department of Communication Disorders Pennsylvania State University University Park
  • John Dattilo
    Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies University of Georgia Athens
  • Jane English
    Department of Communication Disorders Pennsylvania State University University Park
  • Lisa Gutierrez
    Department of Communication Disorders Pennsylvania State University University Park
  • Jane Hartz
    Department of Communication Disorders Pennsylvania State University University Park
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1992
Instructing Facilitators to Support the Communication of People Who Use Augmentative Communication Systems
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1992, Vol. 35, 865-875. doi:10.1044/jshr.3504.865
History: Received March 1, 1991 , Accepted November 8, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1992, Vol. 35, 865-875. doi:10.1044/jshr.3504.865
History: Received March 1, 1991; Accepted November 8, 1991

A single-subject multiple-baseline design, replicated across three dyads, was used to examine the efficacy of instructing facilitators (i.e., significant others) to promote communication with people who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems. Facilitators were instructed in four 1-hour sessions to decrease their conversational control and provide more opportunities for the participants using AAC systems to communicate. Following instruction, facilitators decreased their rates of turn-taking and initiations and increased the proportion of turns that were responsive. Participants using AAC systems increased the frequency of their initiations. Following intervention, turn-taking and initiation patterns in the dyads were more reciprocal. Generalization occurred to the natural environment. Results suggest that facilitator instruction is an effective and efficient means of promoting greater participation in daily interactions by people who use AAC systems.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to express their appreciation to the people using AAC systems and their facilitators who were involved in this study. The names of all participants have been changed to ensure confidentiality.
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