Residual Effects of Preschool Phonology Disorders in Grade School, Adolescence, and Adulthood This study used a cross-sectional design to examine the performance of people with a history of a preschool phonology disorder on measures of phonology, reading, and spelling at preschool age (n=20), grade school age (n=23), adolescence (n=17), and adulthood (n=17). Results showed that at each age group, subjects with a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1992
Residual Effects of Preschool Phonology Disorders in Grade School, Adolescence, and Adulthood
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara A. Lewis
    Department of Pediatrics Case Western Reserve University Rainbow Babies and Childrens Hospital Cleveland, OH
  • Lisa Freebairn
    Department of Pediatrics Case Western Reserve University Rainbow Babies and Childrens Hospital Cleveland, OH
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1992
Residual Effects of Preschool Phonology Disorders in Grade School, Adolescence, and Adulthood
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1992, Vol. 35, 819-831. doi:10.1044/jshr.3504.819
History: Received April 9, 1991 , Accepted December 12, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1992, Vol. 35, 819-831. doi:10.1044/jshr.3504.819
History: Received April 9, 1991; Accepted December 12, 1991

This study used a cross-sectional design to examine the performance of people with a history of a preschool phonology disorder on measures of phonology, reading, and spelling at preschool age (n=20), grade school age (n=23), adolescence (n=17), and adulthood (n=17). Results showed that at each age group, subjects with a history of a disorder performed more poorly than control subjects matched for age, sex, and socioeconomic status in all domains. Comparisons across each successive age group revealed a higher performance on measures from preschool to grade school age, and a smaller but steady improvement from grade school age to adolescence to adulthood. Subjects with a history of other language problems, in addition to the phonology disorder overall, performed more poorly than subjects with a history of a preschool phonology disorder alone on the reading and spelling measures. These findings suggest that remnants of a preschool phonology disorder are detectable past grade school age and into adulthood.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health, NIDCDS Grant No. DC00528. We wish to express our appreciation to all the schools, preschools, and day care centers that provided subjects for this study, especially Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center, Kenston Public Schools, Lake County Society for Rehabilitation of Children and Adults, St. Francis of Assisi School, and St. Joan of Arc School.
We are grateful to Barbara Zucker and Colleen Visconti for their assistance in data collection. We also express our appreciation to Hugh Catts and Bruce Pennington for their experimental measures. We wish to thank Dorothy Aram for her thoughtful comments during preparation of this manuscript.
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