Factors Underlying Neuropsychological Test Performance in Chronic Severe Traumatic Brain Injury The neuropsychological test performance of subjects with traumatic brain injury (TBI) of the closed head type was investigated using a test battery consisting of traditional clinical instruments with expanded language measures. TBI subjects were specifically selected to include only those with a pattern of predominantly diffuse cerebral injury to allow ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1992
Factors Underlying Neuropsychological Test Performance in Chronic Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard K. Peach
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders The University of Georgia, Athens and Department of Rehabilitation Medicine Emory University School of Medicine Atlanta, Georgia
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1992
Factors Underlying Neuropsychological Test Performance in Chronic Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1992, Vol. 35, 810-818. doi:10.1044/jshr.3504.810
History: Received March 26, 1991 , Accepted November 8, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1992, Vol. 35, 810-818. doi:10.1044/jshr.3504.810
History: Received March 26, 1991; Accepted November 8, 1991

The neuropsychological test performance of subjects with traumatic brain injury (TBI) of the closed head type was investigated using a test battery consisting of traditional clinical instruments with expanded language measures. TBI subjects were specifically selected to include only those with a pattern of predominantly diffuse cerebral injury to allow conclusions regarding language performance in the absence of focal aphasia-producing lesions. Factor analysis of the test scores resulted in the extraction of three interpretable factors associated with performance on this battery: perceptual, general language, and mental efficiency. The results were compared to those obtained in previous factor-analytic studies of brain-damaged subjects, revealing patterns for the language/verbal subtests that diverged from those observed formerly. Two explanations are considered for these findings, the first interpretation centering on the notion of select impairments to specific cognitive processes and the second relating to impairments in the capacity to allocate resources effectively.

Acknowledgments
Preparation of this article was supported in part by National Institute of Disability and Rehabilitation Research grant #G008300041 to the Emory University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center.
The assistance of Bonnie Schaude in conducting this study and of Michael Kutner, George Cotsonis, and Scott Rubin in the statistical analyses is gratefully acknowledged. Louise Cording assisted in the data collection. Connie Tompkins, Michael Crary, Malcolm McNeil, and Reg Warren generously provided critical reviews of the manuscript.
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