Did Primitive Man Really Talk Like an Ape? Perkins, Kent, and Curlee (1991)  argue in their theory of neurolinguistic function in stuttering that our speech developed in part from a primitive nonlinguistic signaling system that was used for essential survival communications. Support for this position was drawn from recent studies of the great apes. However, there ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   August 01, 1992
Did Primitive Man Really Talk Like an Ape?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John M. Christensen
    The University of Tulsa Tulsa, OK
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   August 01, 1992
Did Primitive Man Really Talk Like an Ape?
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1992, Vol. 35, 805. doi:10.1044/jshr.3504.805a
History: Received November 7, 1991 , Accepted January 14, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1992, Vol. 35, 805. doi:10.1044/jshr.3504.805a
History: Received November 7, 1991; Accepted January 14, 1992
Acknowledgment
My thanks to Jack Gandour for helpful discussions during the preparation of this commentary and to Edward Conture, Margaret Denny, Ellen Kelly, Laurence Leonard, and Robert Ringel for providing comments on an earlier draft of the manuscript.
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