Reported Use of Communication Strategies by SHHH Members Client, Talker, and Situational Variables Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1992
Reported Use of Communication Strategies by SHHH Members
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy Tye-Murray
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Suzanne C. Purdy
    Departments of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Speech Pathology and Audiology University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • George G. Woodworth
    Department of Statistics University of Iowa, Iowa City
Article Information
Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1992
Reported Use of Communication Strategies by SHHH Members
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1992, Vol. 35, 708-717. doi:10.1044/jshr.3503.708
History: Received January 11, 1991 , Accepted August 13, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1992, Vol. 35, 708-717. doi:10.1044/jshr.3503.708
History: Received January 11, 1991; Accepted August 13, 1991

Two hundred and twelve members of the Self Help for Hard of Hearing People (SHHH) organization completed a survey that evaluated their use of communication strategies Reported use of strategies was correlated with attitudinal variables and social-interaction indices. On average, subjects agreed most strongly with questionnaire items stating they would ask a talker to repeat a misperceived utterance. They agreed less strongly with items stating they would ask the talker to restructure or elaborate an utterance. Subjects agreed strongly that they would use the communication strategies with familiar talkers, and less strongly that they would use them with unfamiliar talkers. Subjects who appeared less likely to say nothing after misperceiving an utterance were more likely to disagree that they were frustrated with their speechreading skills, and they appeared less likely to avoid social Interactions. Subjects who ndicated a greater likelihood of using anticipatory strategies, such as reviewing potential vocabulary before an appointment, were on average more likely to avoid social interactions. They also agreed more strongly that poor speechreaders appear less intelligent

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the Easter Seal Research Foundation and NIH/NINCDS Program Project Grant N520466. We thank Deborah Seyfried, Mary Lowder, Holly Fryauf-Bertschy, Robert Schum, and Richard S. Tyler for their suggestions about the contents of the questionnaire, and Carol De Filippo, Arlene Neuman, and the anonymous reviewers for their insightful comments.
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