Consistent Within-Session Measures of Tinnitus Two psychophysical methods, a method of adjustment (MOA) and a forced-choice double-staircase adaptive procedure (FCDS) (Jesteadt, 1980), were used to measure the predominant pitch and loudness of tinnitus for 11 subjects during one test session. The FCDS within-session variability of matches to tinnitus pitch was smaller than for the MOA ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1992
Consistent Within-Session Measures of Tinnitus
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. J. Penner
    Psychology Department University of Maryland, College Park
  • R. C. Bilger
    Speech and Hearing Science University of Illinois, Champaign
Article Information
Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1992
Consistent Within-Session Measures of Tinnitus
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1992, Vol. 35, 694-700. doi:10.1044/jshr.3503.694
History: Received March 1, 1991 , Accepted August 13, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1992, Vol. 35, 694-700. doi:10.1044/jshr.3503.694
History: Received March 1, 1991; Accepted August 13, 1991

Two psychophysical methods, a method of adjustment (MOA) and a forced-choice double-staircase adaptive procedure (FCDS) (Jesteadt, 1980), were used to measure the predominant pitch and loudness of tinnitus for 11 subjects during one test session. The FCDS within-session variability of matches to tinnitus pitch was smaller than for the MOA and comparable to the within-session variability obtained when the FCDS procedure was used to match objective stimuli that approximated the frequency and level of the tinnitus. The within-session variability of matches to tinnitus loudness was nearly identical for the FCDS and the MOA and comparable to the within-session variability obtained when the FCDS procedure was used to match objective stimuli that approximated the frequency and level of the tinnitus. For 3 subjects who participated in 20 sessions, the two psychophysical methods produced correlated measures of tinnitus that tracked each other between sessions. This suggests that tinnitus may be stable within a brief time span but fluctuant in the long run

This research was supported by the National Institutes of Health (1 R01 DC00068–01). The authors thank Willard Larkin for his comments on a previous version of the manuscript, Terry Huang for his assistance in programming, and Lisa Fenwick-Steen and Melaine Simm for their care in collecting the data reported here.
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