Evaluation of the Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) Test for Hearing Aid Comparisons The SIR test was created for use in hearing aid comparisons. The test protocol obtains listener judgments of the intelligibility of connected speech passages. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the SIR test in differentiating among hearing aids Specific research questions were (a) Is the sensitivity of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1992
Evaluation of the Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) Test for Hearing Aid Comparisons
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • D. Michael McDaniel
    Department of Special Education and Communicative Disorders Arkansas State University State University, AR
  • Robyn M. Cox
    Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology Memphis State University
Article Information
Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1992
Evaluation of the Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) Test for Hearing Aid Comparisons
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1992, Vol. 35, 686-693. doi:10.1044/jshr.3503.686
History: Received January 2, 1991 , Accepted August 26, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1992, Vol. 35, 686-693. doi:10.1044/jshr.3503.686
History: Received January 2, 1991; Accepted August 26, 1991

The SIR test was created for use in hearing aid comparisons. The test protocol obtains listener judgments of the intelligibility of connected speech passages. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the SIR test in differentiating among hearing aids Specific research questions were (a) Is the sensitivity of the SIR test sufficient for differentiating among very similar and slightly dissimilar hearing aids? (b) Does the SIR test result In reliable heanng aid rankings? and (c) What are the effects of using shortened connected speech passages? Ten listeners with hearing impairments rated the intelligibility of both full-length and shortened SIR test passages while wearing each of four individually selected hearing aids representing three different frequency/gain prescriptions. Results suggested that the SIR test is capable of differentiating among slightly dissimilar hearing aids and that hearing aid rankings resulting from speech Intelligibility ratings were reliable. The decision to use full-length or shortened SIR test passages depends on the outcome the user wishes to maximize Under the conditions used n this study, maximum sensitivity was achieved with ratings from five shortened passages, whereas maximum reliability was obtained with three full-length passages.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported in part by the Memphis State University Center for Research Initiatives and Strategies for the Communicatively Impaired (CRISCI) and by VA Rehabilitation Research and Development funds. The authors thank Genevieve Alexander for her technical support, Robert M. Joyce for the development of the software for presentation of the SIR test passages, and Ginny Crihfield-Campbell for her assistance in preparing this manuscript.
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