The Effects of Input-Output Configuration in Syllabic Compression on Speech Perception Speech perception was tested through a broad-band syllabic compressor with four different static input-output configurations. All other parameters of the compressor were held constant. The compressor was implemented digitally and incorporated a delay to reduce overshoot. We studied four different input-output configurations, including a linear reference condition. Normal-hearing and hearing-impaired ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1992
The Effects of Input-Output Configuration in Syllabic Compression on Speech Perception
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marcel J. Maré
    Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Wouter A. Dreschler
    Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Hans Verschuure
    Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Article Information
Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1992
The Effects of Input-Output Configuration in Syllabic Compression on Speech Perception
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1992, Vol. 35, 675-685. doi:10.1044/jshr.3503.675
History: Received December 6, 1990 , Accepted May 22, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1992, Vol. 35, 675-685. doi:10.1044/jshr.3503.675
History: Received December 6, 1990; Accepted May 22, 1991

Speech perception was tested through a broad-band syllabic compressor with four different static input-output configurations. All other parameters of the compressor were held constant. The compressor was implemented digitally and incorporated a delay to reduce overshoot. We studied four different input-output configurations, including a linear reference condition. Normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects participated in the experiments testing perception of meaningful sentences as well as nonsense CVCs in carrier phrases. The speech materials were presented in quiet and in noise. The results from the CVCs were analyzed quantitatively in terms of scores and qualitatively in terms of phoneme confusions. Differences in speech perception due to the different input-output configurations were small. The input-output configuration with the highest amplification of low amplitude sounds yielded the best results. Detailed analysis of the results included a correlational analysis with a number of auditory functions characterizing the ears tested. The pure-tone audiogram provided parameters of auditory sensitivity: average audiometric loss and audiometric slope. Psychophysical tests provided parameters of temporal resolution and frequency selectivity: the temporal resolution factor, temporal gap detection, and auditory filter shape. The correlational analysis showed that the subjects with better temporal acuity obtained better results.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported financially by the Heinsius Houbolt Fonds and the Innovatief Onderzoek Programma Hulpmiddelen Gehandicapten (IOP-HG). The authors thank Roel Hammerschlag, Anne-Carine Hijmans and Rens Leeuw for their assistance in the experiments and analysis of the results. We are grateful to Roel Hammerschlag for his linguistic comments on a preliminary version of this paper.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access